Creating a safe childcare environment

People running childcare centers should be aware of the specific safety measures that should be in place to protect children from accidental injury.

Whether childproofing a home environment that will be used to provide childcare or designing the safety aspects of a public childcare facility, people in Oregon have a lot of things to consider when evaluating how safe the space is for children. There are certain safety concerns that are present in just about any kind of building, and then there are those unique challenges that are presented from one specific property to another. The importance of keeping an eye on children and making sure they are following the rules and behaving well towards one another is equivalent to the importance of making sure that there are no potential hazards that could lead to accidental injury.

Safe daycare design and layout

While many people, when they think of child safety, think of putting locks on cabinets with dangerous chemicals and putting gates on stairs or ledges, there are also some simple and basic areas where it is important to be mindful of the health impact on children. For instance, in the area where children eat, there should be chairs that fit each child and tables of comfortable height. All surfaces should be regularly sanitized and wiped down so there are no traces of chemical residue.

Another thing to consider is a sleeping or napping area. While older children can use mats or cots arranged in a community sleeping area, this won't work for all kids. Infants will need their own cribs with safety guards to keep them in their beds. Children should always be sleeping in an area where they can be supervised. Infants especially should be monitored so as to lower the likelihood of SIDS or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Important safety codes

In addition to the above points around how the areas in a daycare center are set up, it is also important for childcare providers to follow these regulations from the National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance:

  • There should be no openings that a child's limb could get caught and stuck in.
  • Any electrical devices that will be used by children should be kept away from sinks and other water containers.
  • All electrical outlets must be covered with a tamper-resistant protector.
  • Any surface higher than 30 inches off the ground is required to have a protective barricade, as it is possible that a fall could result in a neck or back injury.

Building maintenance should also regularly check to make sure the whole building meets fire safety code.

Anyone living in Oregon who has had to deal with their child being injured may have expensive medical bills to pay. An attorney in the local area who practices personal injury law may be able to help people who are in this situation to get the financial compensation they are seeking.